Course development completion at Bonnie Doon

The final stage of our masterplan at a Bonnie Doon Golf Club opened last week, marking the end of eight years of construction over four separate phases. The Doon holds a special place for OCCM as they were our first new client, engaged to prepare a masterplan back in 2010.

We always felt the course boasted all the key ingredients for great golf and we hope that with the conclusion of works that these have been realised. The abundance of sand, bold contours and some excellent excalmple of vegetation were in some ways reminiscent to parts of the sandbelt with which we are especially familiar.

The final stage comprises the new first, second and seventeenth holes along, with a large practice putting green and a second short game facility complimenting the area down close to the driving range. 

The first

The new long par 4 1st is played over some beautifully undulating ground to a terrific green site, just below the hill it shares with the 17th. Interestingly this was the previous 18th hole but played in reverse with the large valley now used to play over for the approach, originally a feature of the tee shot. A series of bunkers and sandy wastes dominate the left side of the hole and link the 1st to the 2nd but they shouldn’t trouble the thoughtful golfer as the large expanses of short grass to the right of the green and away from trouble will help feed a ball toward the target. The area around the clubhouse has changed significantly with a new large practice putting green and 1st tee taking up the ground just in front of the verandah….a nervous start awaits for those who don’t like a crowd!

The second

The 2nd plays as a short par 4 along the same corridor as the old 10th hole. The fairway is shaped a little like a bottle; wider closer to the tee and narrower the further down toward the green. The conservative play will be a long iron played left when the pin is right and right when the pin is left. Bunkers are scattered along both sides of the fairway so playing to the edges to gain the best angle will come with some risk.  The most aggressive play will be a driver but this must navigate perhaps the narrowest section of fairway on the property.

We’ve added the option of using a forward tee to play this as a difficult long par 3, something currently missing from a course which features a number of short 4’s and 5’s.

The seventeenth

The 17th plays across a lovely piece of ground, with a generous fairway narrowing down at driving distance between the large dune on the left and bunkers on the right. The green site sits against the same large dune on the left, and the canny golfer may choose to use this to their advantage by banking an approach shots off the slope rather than flirting with the bunker on the right.

Queensland Assistant Superintendent Recognition Award

For the last three years, OCCM Golf Design have partnered with the Golf Course Superintendent’s Association of Queensland to sponsor the Queensland Assistant Superintendent Recognition Award. Each year, the recipient of the award gets to spend two weeks with OCCM staff, onsite at a current project. This is an amazing opportunity to work alongside a variety of people from the architects to the shapers, and to learn what goes into our projects from a project manager’s perspective. The lucky recipient also gets a chance to get his or her hands dirty, helping the crew in the field.

The first winner of this great award was Stuart Campbell, from Maroochy River Golf Club. Unfortunately Stuart was unable to travel to Melbourne, however we were lucky enough to have Ash Hill from Arundel Hills travel down in his place. Ash gained some valuable experience working alongside OCCM staff at Peninsula Kingswood Country Golf Club.

Last year, Garry Kunz from Byron Bay Golf Club won the award and came down to spend time learning about our design and construction methods. He spent some time with Hayden Mead at Kingston Heath Golf Club working with the staff doing course setup and learning the art of maintaining pure Bentgrass greens.

This year, Garry McClymont from Twin Waters is the worthy recipient. He will be spending his time at our exciting new project at Lonsdale Golf Club. Garry will be involved in all aspects of the Lonsdale project from the design to construction, and growing in of both cool and warm season grasses in Melbourne.

Garry McClymont on the job at Lonsdale Golf Club

Victoria Golf Club sneak preview


Works at Victoria Golf Club are nearing completion with all holes under grow-in and fine tuning underway in readiness for member opening on February 16, 2019.  

A view looking backward down the opening hole.


For those unfamiliar with the project, the main focus has revolved around the conversion of the putting surfaces from predominantly poa annua to Pure Distinction bent-grass to help produce more consistently firm, fast putting surface; synonymous to sand belt golf.  For the most part greens have been a pure reinstatement of contours with extensive survey before and after and the use of some purpose built machinery designed to replicate contours within a few millimetres.  

The new practice putting green has been increased in size by 50%….now measuring close to 1800m2


A few greens required minor changes in order to increase the amount of pinnable area such as the steeply contoured 6th, 11th and 13th, but at each we have been able to retain the internal contours and adjust the overall tilt so to the casual observer it seems as though little change has occurred at all.  Outside of this there have been a few areas where we have been able to add a pin position as a result of extending the greens to the edge of bunkers or into areas which were previously surround.  These subtle changes have helped add to the variety and create even more interesting golf.  Of particular note will be the new back right pin on the 2nd, back left pins at the 3rd, at the front of the 7th, front of the 9th, and on the left of the 16th. 
Greens will now feature putting surface all the way to the edge of the surrounding bunkers.  This small change will obviously has an aesthetic difference but more importantly helps maximise the number of pin positions and emphasise the strategy by allowing pins to be tucked even closer to the surrounding hazards.  

A view looking back down the 17th hole (the new fairway bunkers are yet to be built in this photo).


Greens will now feature putting surface all the way to the edge of the surrounding bunkers.  This small change will obviously has an aesthetic difference but more importantly helps maximise the number of pin positions and emphasise the strategy by allowing pins to be tucked even closer to the surrounding hazards.

The 2nd green. The short right bunker is a new addition – but largely a reinstatement, with bunkers originally built here and obvious in the 1930’s oblique aerial photo.


The most significant changes come at the 5th, 12th and 17th holes which weren’t original greens and we felt could be improved.  The new 5th green has shifted slightly left and combined with some adjustments to the fairway bunkers offers a more interesting hole and importantly helps differentiate it from the 2nd and 3rd which all featured very similar tee shots.  The new green is bunkered left and right and is wide at the back and narrower at the front.  Back left pins will reward play down the right near the original fairway bunker while pins in the right half will favour tee shots over the new short left fairway bunker and near the indigenous area up the left.  A larger high tee behind the 4th green offers the alternative to play the 5th as a short par four…a pleasant alternative to the more common long par four tee.  

The 9th green…the right third of the putting surface has been added and offers some great alternative pin positions.

Looking across the new 12th


The new 12th green better matches the strategy set up on the tee, with hazards front left and back left clearly rewarding play from the inside corner of the dogleg and near the hazard.  What was previously a fairway bunker here has been converted into a shallower indigenous area which offers a better chance of recovery. 

Looking across the 15th


Finally at the 17th fairway bunkers now feature down the right of the hole which help soften the bank of the water storage but also guard the inside corner of the dogleg…a more conventional way to arrange a hole that turns.  The new green has been shifted a little forward and left, out from behind the trees, and matches with the strategy of bunkers down the right.  The new green has hazards guarding the left and back of the green while a deep hollow sits front right, similar to the fabulous hollow on the 4th hole.  
Tees have been levelled as part of the works with extra teeing options at the 5th, 7th and 17th hole – the latter providing the alternative to play the par five as a long par four occasionally or under tournament conditions.  

In addition to the earthworks, the project has also included the installation of a new irrigation system and replacement of 7 hectares of cool season grass with couch from on site and off.  

Looking backward down the new 5th.

Looking back down the 7th.  The extended front section of the green is visible here, as is the opened up area of sand and indigenous vegetation between the 6th and 7th in the left of the image. 

The 16th hole – now featuring a interesting new pin position on the left close to the bunker


Good friend Nick Wall from Airswing Media came by late last month and was kind enough to shoot some footage to help highlight the work.


Wishing everyone a happy and safe holiday season and a prosperous 2019!
:: Mike Cocking

Bonnie Doon Golf Club Mid-construction Update Stage 4

The fourth and final stage of our redesign at Bonnie Doon GC is almost complete with grassing of greens and fairways to take place over the next month. After 8 years we’ll finally have a complete and consistent 18 hole course and we look forward to continuing to work with the club to see it realise its enormous potential.

 

A little about the holes themselves……

1st Hole

The new long par 4 1st is played over some beautifully undulating ground to a terrific green site, just below the hill it shares with the 17th. Interestingly this was the previous 18th hole but played in reverse with the large valley now used to play over for the approach, originally a feature of the tee shot. A series of bunkers and sandy wastes dominate the left side of the hole and link the 1st to the 2nd but they shouldn’t trouble the thoughtful golfer as the large expanses of short grass to the right of the green and away from trouble will help feed a ball toward the target. The area around the clubhouse has changed significantly with a new large practice putting green and 1st tee taking up the ground just in front of the verandah….a nervous start awaits for those who don’t like a crowd!

2nd Hole

The 2nd plays as a short par 4 along a similar the same corridor as the old 10th hole.

We’ve added the option of using a forward tee to play this as a difficult long par 3, something currently missing from a course which features a number of short 4’s and 5’s.

 

17th Hole

The 17th plays across a lovely piece of ground shaped a little like a bottle….wide at the start of the fairway and narrowing at driving distance with a large dune on the left and bunkers on the right. The green site sits against the same large dune on the left and the canny golfer may choose to use this to their advantage by banking an approach shots off the slope, rather than flirting with the bunker on the right.

Short Game Facility

Finally a new short game facility sits in the first half of the old 9th and offers golfers another option for practise or a brief warm up prior to their round rather than having to make the journey down to the driving range.

Greens replacement at Victoria GC

Work commenced this week on the replacement of greens at Victoria Golf Club, converting what are predominantly poa surfaces to Pure Distinction bentgrass, a relatively new variety but one which has gained in popularity in recent times.  We have had experience with this variety at a few courses including our redesign of Royal Canberra and more recently Peninsula Kingswood.

The significance of this work is not lost of our firm with many greens (2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 15, 16 and 18) among some of the oldest original surfaces on the sand-belt.  To ensure contours are correctly reinstated we have undertaken detailed surveys of each green complex and utilised some sophisticated grading equipment to attain a high degree of accuracy.

In addition to the re-instatment of the original greens the works also include some design alterations to 3 of the newer green complexes (5, 12 and 17) where our aim is to create greens and bunkers closer in style to the originals.  Tees are also being levelled with a few extra areas created and minor works to some bunkers, paths and indigenous vegetation areas.

Works are estimated to be complete by Christmas with the full course in play In February 2019.

We are also delighted with the recent news that Victoria has been awarded the Australian Open in 2022.  It will be the first time the tournament has returned in almost two decades and a fabulous way to showcase the work.

:: Mike Cocking

First Professional Event at Revamped Royal Canberra Layout

The first professional event following the redevelopment of the main 18 hole layout at Royal Canberra will take place over 54 holes from the 9th to 11th February. The ActewAGL Canberra Classic will feature a host of world class female professionals including Jiya Shin, European number one Georgia Hall, Cheyenne Woods and former world number one Laura Davies

The Royal Canberra course has recently re-entered the Golf Australia Magazine Top 100 ranking list at #20, a significant improvement from its position of #70 in the 2014 list. Judges highlighted the additional width that has been created by the redesign and the strategic interest this adds to the layout. The improved course conditioning has no doubt also contributed to the course’s improved ranking position.

:: Mike Cocking

World Super 6 at Lake Karrinyup

Lake Karrinyup will this week play host to the World Super 6 Perth, a co-sanctioned event with the European, Asian and Australiasia PGA Tour. This event will offer the first look at recent course changes which includes the re-profiling of all 18 greens and bunker reshaping to reclaim the rugged style original designer Alex Russell envisaged.

The front nine work was completed in late 2017, while work on the back nine will commence in the months following the event. Pictured below are the 5th and 8th holes, both par 3s, which highlight the rugged bunker edges that will henceforth define their character.

:: Mike Cocking


 

 

Peninsula Kingswood North Course Holes 10-15 Open for Preview Play

Holes 10 to 15 of the North course open today for preview play as part of an interim composite course.  Featuring one of the most spectacular loops on the property, this is the first chance members will have to play the new holes which have been out of play for much of the past year.  While the holes largely remain in their previous position, changes have been made to bunkering, greens, sandy wastes and native heathland areas.  A new 10th green, built in a redan style and pushed some 40 metres further back, is a noticeable change which also creates an opportunity to play the hole as both a strong par 4 or shorter par 5.  Likewise at the par 5 15th, a new set of tees have been constructed nearer the 14th green to allow occasional play as a long 4 – particularly when the 10th is played at its full length.  Major changes will also be noticeable on the 11th, 13th, 14th and 15th greens whilst the table-top green at the 12th which extends from the unique hogback fairway has largely been retained.

The front nine construction is largely complete with holes under grow in with construction shifting to the clubhouse zone and practice facilities.  All 36 holes are expected to be complete and open for play later in the year.

The image below shows the par-3 14th hole from above. Additional images of the new holes, taken by Gary Lisbon, will be released via our social media channels in the coming weeks.

:: Mike Cocking

 

19th at Kingston Heath Now Open

We’re delighted to announce the opening of our new 19th hole at Kingston Heath.

Originally built to provide an extra hole while the club was undergoing a greens conversion from Penncross bent to A1, over time the clubs 19th also become a way of ‘resting’ a par 3 out on the course.  More recently it became part of the tournament layout, with the PGA Tour and Golf Australia having a preference for taking out the 10th and incorporating this hole as a way of improving the spectator movement around the course and to allow the 4th tee to move back onto the 10th.

Whilst the old 19th was sound, there were opportunities for improvement.

 

Agronomically the green never performed as well as the other 18 and rebuilding the hole has allowed us to ensure the putting surface has the same consistency in speed and firmness as the ‘main’ holes.

From a design point of view the new 19th has provided an opportunity to better match the Morcom and Mackenzie style of green and bunker design.  Their best bunkers are intricately shaped with capes and bays creating irregular, natural looking hazards while putting surfaces typically feature long grades and edges that rise up into the surrounding bunkers or mounds.  These slopes serve to penalize missed shots on the ‘short-side’ by shouldering the ball further away from the hole but also act as a back stop for golfers approaching from the other side of the hole.

The tee carry has also been rebuilt with many hundreds of cubic metres of native soil used to undulations, then planted with the same combination of heathland plants and grasses to mimic the similar areas at the 4th, 5th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 15th and 18th holes.

The 19th plays between 135m (men) and 110m (women) with a longer tee also added at around 160 or 165m for tournament use and to offer some variety when the 10th and 19th holes are both in play, rather than asking for the same type of shot.

 

 

View More

 

 

 

:: Mike Cocking

Shady Oaks Little Nine

The little nine at Shady Oaks opened in July 2017 – our first project in the United States.  Made famous as the practice ground where long time member Ben Hogan sought to perfect his swing, the little nine might be the ideal model for how courses should use a spare parcel of land.  As a formal course, 9 holes can be played with a combination of par three’s and short par fours, but the real fun begins when members choose to play cross country.

 

With no formal tees golfers are encouraged to be creative.  Choose a green and a starting point…use your imagination.  We’ve come up with at least 20 different holes ranging anywhere from a  60 yard pitch to a 400 yard par 4 but doubtless there are others yet to be discovered.  The only rule is that the winner of the previous hole should choose the one to follow.

 

Holes have been designed where they can be played from practically anywhere so a number of bunkers or sections of green that don’t make sense when played as a formal course will start to when play cross county.  Beyond this the little nine becomes perhaps the ultimate practice facility – with practically every shot up to 350 yards possible.  The only problem is finding a time when its quite enough to empty your shag bag.

 

View More

New Project Announcement :: Lan Hai

We are pleased to announce our first project in China – Lan Hai International Golf Club  A 36-hole development on Chongming Island on the Yangtze River an hour from the middle of Shanghai. Built as a links course by reclaiming material from the Yangtze River the wish of the new owners is to improve the design of the championship course.  Whilst there are some routing changes our main focus is rebuilding the greens and bunkers both to improve their shaping and to accentuate their strategic interest.  Work commenced on the ‘punchbowl’ green-site at the 9th in the first week of July and will continue for the next nine to twelve months.

 

View More

New 14th Hole at Cranbourne Golf Club

The Melbourne sandbelt is full of great short holes made on unremarkable, flat land. It was the sand and the beautiful low-growing heathland plants that allowed for the construction of some of the greatest short holes in the game. The new 14th at Cranbourne provides another such example and prior to clearing the site it was difficult to gauge exactly what the land would feel like. We suspected it would be a good site for a new hole but only once the noxious weeds and debris from its days as a tip site were removed, was the potential of the new hole revealed.

Like most of the great short par threes in Melbourne including the 9th at Commonwealth, the 10th at Kingston Heath and the 13th on Royal Melbourne’s West Course, the 14th demands a quality tee shot. At only 135m metres birdies are possible and perhaps even expected on occasion by the better player, but a miss here is an ever-present danger and will almost certainly result in a bogey or worse.

The advantage of the new hole is that it perfectly links the 13th green to the 15th tee, eliminating the long walk to the current 14th tee as well as providing a hole that runs south-north, which no other par 3 on the course currently does.

The new green and bunkering is sympathetic to Sam Berrimen’s original green complexes and the indigenous heathland which was such a part of the tee carry of the old hole has been translocated here to help create a more natural setting and give the impression the hole has always existed.

:: Mike Cocking

New 19th Hole at Victoria Golf Club

This short video provides an update on the new 19th hole and practice area at Victoria Golf Club, which is now well established having been built approximately 12 months ago.
:: Mike Cocking

Update on the North Course at Peninsula Kingswood

With nearly all holes on the South course now open for member play, our work at Peninsula Kingswood has moved on to the North course. This video update features drone footage from December 2016 of the North course’s back nine, providing a glimpse of the scale of transformation that is taking place. Our work on the North course will continue throughout 2017, with all 36 holes due to be open for play during 2018.

:: Mike Cocking

New 9th Hole at Ranfurlie

This video provides an update on recent work at Ranfurlie Golf Club in Melbourne, which involved a redesign to the 9th hole. The new hole is due to open for play in April 2017.

:: Ashley

More New Holes Open at Peninsula Kingswood

Four new holes opened for play this week on the South course at Peninsula Kingswood, with the 3rd, 6th, 7th and 10th (temporary) being incorporated into the 18 hole composite course. Next month we expect to open the 4th, 5th and 18th holes, which will complete the opening of the South course.

Works meanwhile continue on the North course, with the revamped 36 hole course scheduled to open in full in 2018. More images from Gary Lisbon will be released in the coming months to showcase the work completed so far.

Portsea Golf Club Appointment

We’re pleased to announce that Ogilvy, Clayton, Cocking & Mead has been appointed as course architects and professional consultants to Portsea Golf Club. The Portsea course is one we are very familiar with having been involved with the redesign of the course during the 1990’s and early 2000’s, a period over which it rose from outside the top 50 and into the top 25 courses in the country. The course has immense potential, and we look forward to working closely with the club over the coming years to further enhance its quality.

:: Mike Cocking

Cranbourne GC :: 14th Hole

Our new 14th hole at Cranbourne Golf Club is progressing well after finishing construction and grassing in spring. The below drone video provides a unique perspective of the new hole and helps explain a little about where the hole sits and how it plays. We expect play will commence in late summer ready for the club championships.

 

:: Mike Cocking

Stage One of the Little Nine Opens at Shady Oaks

The first stage of our little nine project at Shady Oaks in Fort Worth, Texas has opened for play, consisting of greens 2, 3 and 7 and around a dozen bunkers that were constructed in June and July this year.

Our concept for the Little Nine is two fold. On one hand it offers members with a break from the big course – somewhere to play a quick nine if time is pressing or for those learning the game or who find the big course too long or difficult.

But the best and most exciting feature of the Little Nine is the ability to play cross country golf. This concept allows golfers the opportunity to essentially decide for themselves where to play to rather than be confined to the tradition route of 1 through 9. Rather than a formal set of teeing boxes, broad expanses of short grass allow golfers to choose where to play from – just find a level area and let your imagination take over. Bunkers have been spread across the landscape and whilst some may seem out of play when the formal nine is played, the reasons for their positioning will become apparent when the cross country holes are played.

Outside of playing holes during quite times it also provides perhaps the best place on the property to practice. Nowhere else can someone seek out the same lies and shots they would find on the course, or stand in the one position and play to 4 or 5 different greens.

We’re excited to be completing the works this January (2017) on the remaining 6 greens and bunkers.

:: Mike Cocking

New Nine at Royal Canberra Opens for Play

We’re please to announce that the new back nine on Royal Canberra’s original 18-hole course has opened for play this week to great acclaim from members, guests and the media. Celebrations for the opening included a ribbon cutting by the Governor General Sir Peter Cosgrove and a demonstration match featuring Geoff Ogilvy. This milestone marks the completion of the original 18-hole course, with the front nine completed 12-months ago. The future redesign of holes 19-27 will then complete the project, and further contribute to Royal Canberra’s elevation back into the top echelon of clubs in the country.

The back nine takes in some of the best land on the property, with the stretch of holes from 13 through 17 being the most dramatic. This stretch includes the long par-4 14th hole (see below) that plays over the edge of Lake Burley Griffin, the design of which was loosely based on Commander Harris’ original design. Tree removal down the right of the old hole helped create a wide corridor – so wide that we felt it could handle a central bunker to help set up some of the strategy of the hole from the tee. The green features wings that serve to emphasise this strategy, with a left pin rewarding an approach from the right of the fairway close to the lake, while for a right pin the strategy flips, favouring an approach from the left.

Over the coming weeks we will post some hole-by-hole images and commentary, including before and after pictures in order to help explain how the holes have changed and the reasons for the changes.

:: Mike Cocking

The Little Nine at Shady Oaks

We’re delighted to announce that work begins on the ‘little nine’ at Shady Oaks CC in Texas early next month.

Routed on just over 5 hectares, the little nine represents an important part of the game beyond just its historical significance of the place where Mr Hogan honed his craft (the famed Oak under which he hit thousands of golf balls still stands in the north-east corner). The little nine represents perhaps the ultimate practice facility and short course – could there be a better use of a small space such as this?

With 9 formal greens and bunkers, it offers a somewhere to have a quick nine, a ‘break’ from the big course or somewhere for beginners to learn the game. Rather than a formal set of teeing boxes, the little nine will feature broad expanses of short grass to allow the ability to move tee markers around considerably. The limitation coming only with its popularity – the fewer people on the little nine, the more interesting the holes can be.

As a practice facility golfers, can seek out the same lies and shots they would find on the course, or stand in the one position and play to 4 or 5 different greens. Essentially, the little nine allows players to practice every conceivable shot up to 300 yards.

In our mind, the best and most exciting feature of the little nine is the ability to play cross-country golf. This concept allows the golfers to essentially decide for themselves where to play to rather than be confined to the tradition route of 1 through 9. Similar areas have been built including the H-O-R-S-E course at the Prairie Club as well as our own 4-hole loop at RACV Healesville and we hope to see many more in the years to come.

:: Mike

The Practice Facility

THEY say practise makes perfect but in golf, much of that depends on the quality of the facility you have to practise at. In this article I explore some of the game’s great practice facilities and hopefully help inspire golfers and clubs alike to take practising the game more seriously.

Before and After

Before and After

 

Before and After

Before and After

Click here to continue reading

:: Mike

The practice facility at Victoria GC: with improvements to turf, drainage and a scattering of bunkers, the practice facility now resembles a golf hole and provides a much more stimulating place to practise.

Kingston Heath Practice Facilities

The new practice putting green and front tee at Kingston Heath has opened after being rebuilt in Spring 2015. The entire front lawn area has been reshaped to maximise the size of the practice green & tee, and generally to improve the contouring of the area. The putting green extends all the way to the courtyard and better reflects the slopes of the greens on the golf course. In addition we’ve created a perfectly level section close to the pro-shop where golfers can practise their stroke. To view the plan we prepared for the club, click here.

:: Mike





 

Bonnie Doon Stage 2 is Open!

Saturday April 26th Bonnie Doon Golf Club in Sydney, Australia opened the Stage 2 holes from our Master Plan to their membership for play.   Here is an overview of the 8th and 16th holes.  We will feature the 11th and Spare hole later this week.

 

8th hole
The uphill 8th hole has largely retained the tee and green positions of the old hole, but the ground in between has altered significantly. Two rows of vegetation have been removed from the left and right, opening up the original corridor and allowing for a more open view up the hole and the fairway is almost double the width.



One of the challenges of the renovation was correcting the steep slope that ran across the fairway from high right to low left. The slope was so severe that even when the fairway was the slow running kikuyu grass, shots would rarely stay on the cut surface. One can only how this would have fared once the conversion to couchgrass was complete.





To create a more playable fairway area we built a tier or spine running lengthways through its middle, creating an upper (right) and lower (left) section of fairway.

 

The green has been set up to favour a shot up the narrower right hand section of fairway, with the reward both a more direct line and clear view of the target. Conversely, the shot from the left hand side of the fairway is both blind and requires a pitch over a steep bank filled with bunkers.

 



 



Hole 16
The dogleg 16th, played over the edge of a large sand dune filled with bunkers features one of the more dramatic tee shots on the course. The largest of the bunkers must be negotiated in order to gain the best line into the angled green, whether short of, over or skirting as near to as possible.



Players can decide to take no risk at all and stay well short of the bunker on the corner, however the shot to the green is largely blind, with only the top half of the flag visible.

Such decisions didn’t exist on the old hole. The tee was well right of its current location and the corner of the hole was covered in pine trees. Whilst long hitters could play over the trouble, short hitters had no hope of a clear second.



Some may accuse us of ‘straightening another dogleg’ but like most of the great short par fours in the world, the golfer on the tee can at least get a glimpse of the target they are to attack. To the right of the 16th lies the spare hole. In the early stages of shaping we looked to try and hide the spare from view, but it felt forced and the ridge used to hide the spare green from view also detracted from the 16th tee. In the end we decided to link the two rather than separate them, with short grass tieing the fairways together and the greenside bunkers of the spare coming into play of off the 16th tee.



 



 

:: Mike Cocking